Tag Archives: vintage clothing

  • The value of vintage: what's it worth?

    October 24, 2011

    This post is one we have been thinking about for a while but have only just got round to composing and (if you're reading this) publishing. It's about the relative value of vintage from the perspective of  a frockophile who turned a passion for collecting and wearing 'old clothes' into a business. Since the aforesaid collecting habit had taken over most of the house, it was either that or divorce, and it's therefore gratifying to report at this juncture that the frockers are still happily hitched!

    A couple of red wine fuelled 'confessionals' with fellow business owners at a recent social gathering caused us to reflect on our own steep learning curve since starting out. Back in 2007, we not only had lofty ambitions to be a more affordable alternative to existing vintage stores which we felt were a tad overpriced, but we were also keen to offer quality preloved contemporary clothing because our own wardrobe was not exclusively vintage and our focus was on sustainability as well as style. We saw our recycling model as a timely antidote to the rash of fast fashion that seemed to be sweeping the nation and which greatly offended our green sensibilities. So far so good.

    Still mulling over the frockers' progress, which has not been without bumps in the road, we happened upon this blog post in which the author considers the value of vintage fashion and, specifically, its pricing in the marketplace. The post was interesting from a personal point of view, not just because it linked to one of our frocks, but also because it mentioned Portobello Road market, one of our very favourite places (although it's not what it used to be, thanks to the encroachment of developers, and is indeed now fighting for its very survival).

    We visit London as often as possible (more regularly now that our daughter lives there - that's her on our website top banner!) and it invariably turns into a busman's holiday as we trek around vintage markets and shops to see what's on offer. Some of the prices can certainly be eye-watering, but we imagine the rents, pitches and other overheads must be equally eye-watering for the traders. Not to mention the cost of living generally.

    Living in Notting Hill in the 80s, when vintage was still very much a minority sport and Hugh Grant and Julia Roberts hadn't yet sent local property prices into the stratosphere, the future chief frocker's passion for all things retro was confirmed on Portobello Road and further nurtured at nearby Kensington Market. Back in '81, while her work colleagues headed to Harrods to spend suitably big bucks on posh frocks for an event where they were to be presented to the Queen (as patron of their employing organisation), Alison bought a vintage black velvet gown for a tenner at Kensington Market, having fallen in love with it at first sight. She still owns it, and despite it now being several sizes too small, will never part with it. That was to be the story of her life, which eventually led to frocking for a living and loving it!

    But back to the salient point of that blog post, where the author ponders the price of vintage clothing after a shocking encounter with an especially expensive frock down the market. As a vintage aficionada and aspiring trader with frugal frocking tendencies, she speculates on the extent to which greed might play a part in pricing. She also wonders, quite reasonably, whether it might be wiser from a self preservation point of view to price items in line with those of other sellers rather than undercut them and risk suffering a damaging blow in the popularity stakes.

    That conundrum took us right back to our own early business planning days and we're the first to admit that when we started out our pricing was a bit haphazard. In our quest to keep prices low, our mark-up was based simply on what we had originally paid for our stock (sometimes years ago) or, in the case of consignment customers, a mutually agreed selling price. Hindsight is a great thing and, if we are being completely honest, we failed to properly analyse all the other costs associated with running our business as we were first and foremost in it for the love rather than the money. Although our overheads were low, and still are, they all need to be factored in to maintain a degree of solvency and keep us in wine!

    Our pricing is now a rather more sophisticated process based on a combination of factors, including the condition, era, size, style, label and current market desirability of our stock, rather than just a straight mark-up on what we  originally paid for it. We also factor in the other overheads like website running costs, rent and storage, sourcing costs, postage and packaging, marketing, administration and compliance with all the legal aspects of running an ecommerce business such as the distance selling regulations.

    Selling one of your own old frocks on ebay is a fairly simple exercise, but moving up a gear to buy and resell multiple frocks means you are no longer a private seller and automatically acquire legal liabilities, all of which need to be costed and met from your profits. Contrary to the head-in-the-sand belief of some sellers on ebay and elsewhere, that includes accepting returns of online purchases whether you like it or not!

    By way of exemplifying relative value, we sold a vintage 70s John Charles cocktail dress earlier this year for £28. It was a real head turner, in very good but not mint condition, and it lasted less than 24 hours on our website before winging its way off to a new home. Imagine our surprise when, shortly afterwards, we coincidentally came across the same dress in a different colour on sale for a staggering £249 while randomly browsing another vintage site (as you do in this business!)  We were frankly astonished because, gorgeous as the dress was, it was not (in our opinion) worth such a massive price tag by any stretch of the imagination. We know we're Scottish, but seriously...

    While there are undoubtedly big price discrepancies in the vintage fashion business, at the same time there are so many variables involved that 'fair' and consistent pricing is essentially a difficult balancing act. Bricks and mortar shops, market pitches and online stores all have different fixed overheads to factor into the equation just to break even, and then there are other important elements to cost, like that bottomless money pit also known as a marketing budget so that prospective customers can actually find your wares.

    These things are all expensive, as increasingly grumpy ebay sellers will testify, given that their ever-rising fees are inextricably  linked to the significant overheads incurred by the giant platform as it seeks to maintain its place as market leader. While greed is undoubtedly a prime motivating factor for some, from corporate giants like ebay and Google right down to the smallest bedroom-based entrepreneurs, it is just one element of a highly complicated mix.

    In order to survive, as well as eat, all business owners need to turn a profit (hardly rocket science!) but we frockers are committed to keeping affordability and sustainability at the heart of ours. In fact, such is the emotional investment in our micro business, we'd definitely be doing something else if we wanted to make serious money!

    Once the poor relation, vintage has finally succeeded in throwing off its musty old image (with a bit of help from Lily Allen et al) to become a celebrated subset of mainstream fashion. As such, it is inevitably attracting its share of sharks and opportunists who will always find a way to make a fast buck and excessive profits from whatever they see as being ripe for exploitation (think Portobello Road and developers). We can only hope that they will eventually move on to the next big thing, but we're not holding our breath.

    It never used to be so, but just like Notting Hill property, vintage prices seem to be spiralling ever upwards and there will always be people with more money than sense. In the meantime, we'll just carry on regardless, vaunting the vintage, rocking the retro and celebrating the second hand, all the while sticking to the same slow fashion principles on which the Frockery was first founded.

  • Frockery Focus: Mary Quant

    April 6, 2011

    Mary Quant is one of those iconic designers who is synonymous with the swinging 60s and jet set 70s London. Born in Blackheath, south east London, in 1934, she completed a Diploma in Art Education at Goldsmith’s College before undertaking an apprenticeship as a couture milliner.

    In 1955, Quant and her husband Alexander Plunket Greene opened the trendsetting boutique ‘Bazaar’, which soon became renowned for its avant-garde window displays, in Chelsea’s King’s Road. Mixing  with artists and musicians, they embraced the bohemian ‘café society’ lifestyle of the day and made the 'London Look' their own.

    Frustrated at being unable to source the type of fashion she felt would appeal to the emerging mod youth culture of which she herself was inextricably part, Quant soon began designing her own clothing based on the key principles of simplicity and affordability. Her Ginger Group was founded in 1963, followed by the famous paintbox make-up and cosmetic range in 1966, by which time Quant was at the top of the London fashion industry and established as a worldwide brand.

    Mary Quant is credited with having ‘invented’ the mini skirt, although she claims to have simply taken the concept from the street, named it after her favourite Mini car and turned it into popular fashion. In 1966, she was awarded an OBE for her outstanding contribution to the fashion industry, arriving at Buckingham Palace to receive the honour wearing a trademark micro mini skirt and sporting her classic Vidal Sassoon bob.

    It is a privilege to be able to offer some vintage Mary Quant items at The Frockery. Dating from the early 1970s, these three eminently collectable pieces arrived along with two vintage Viyella blouses, one in a paisley pattern and the other in an art nouveau print, which we also absolutely love.  Even better, they are all in unworn condition and look to be dead stock, possibly from a 70s Scottish boutique.

    Just click on the images to be taken to the catalogue listings.

    Mary Quant vintage 70s blouse

    Vintage Mary Quant beige blouse

    Mary Quant vintage teal needlecord shirt

  • New wardrobe resolution and an eco-fashion challenge

    January 9, 2011

    It seems some New Year's resolutions are just made to be broken. In our own case, falling off the chocolate wagon happened overnight as we discovered some Thornton's beauties lurking in the cupboard in which we were stashing away the Christmas decorations. There must have been a good reason for their careful concealment (possibly from young pub returners seeking late night sustenance over the festive season), but they were a welcome sight and, like the resolution, didn't last long.

    Other resolutions are easier to keep and so far we have managed to wear preloved, vintage or hand made clothes every day of the year, both at work and at play. We can highly recommend it (we would, wouldn't we!) as it is utterly painless and requires no element of self denial whatsoever.  It also makes sound eco-sense, both economical and ecological, as well as being a fun fashion challenge.

    In celebration of  hand made, vintage and recycled, we  have decided to keep our not so new year's resolution for as long as  possible and are encouraging friends, fans and followers to join us by embracing our eco-fashion February challenge during the shortest, darkest and most depressingly bill-filled month of the year.

    The rules are simple: all or most of your clothing has to be hand made, vintage, recycled or second hand for the 28 consecutive days of February (no cheating!)

    Tell us how you get on by posting your pictures, outfit descriptions, sources and costs on the Frockery Facebook page and we'll offer a £50 Frockery voucher to the most stylish and creative eco-fashionista at the end of the month.

    You have a few weeks to think about it and we'll post a reminder at the end of January.  Go on, it'll be fun!  You may even end up enjoying it so much that you keep on eco-frocking throughout the year!

    Meanwhile, you'll find some good reasons and 'RE' action ideas here.

    recycling symbol

    Back to shop

  • Frocky horror, or style sensation?

    August 11, 2010

    Like Marmite, you will either love or hate this shimmery blue 1980s jumpsuit / flying suit which we have just added to the catalogue. To be frank, the jury is still out at Frockery Towers, but it can certainly be described as sensational and is not for the faint hearted fashionista.  Abba aficionadas , come on down!

    8os flying suit jumpsuit

    One which didn’t quite make the catalogue (as a Facebook fan snapped it up) was this psychedelic 60s number, which has apparently already caused a sensation in the customer’s local Asda. The George clothing line can’t quite compete with original vintage!

    Those who aren’t quite ready to embrace such 'in your face' fashion need have no fear, however, as we have something for everyone at The Frockery, where our focus is on finding new homes for all those previously ‘must have’ items that have turned into ‘has beens’  and found themselves relegated to the back of  wardrobes or abandoned in attics, sometimes for decades.

    Take a look at the fab frockery in our latest update and you will find some exceedingly wearable vintage and retro fashion, as well as a huge selection of preloved contemporary clothing and accessories at a fraction of their original cost.  Don’t be fooled  by the fickle fashion police into following the crowd when you can mix and match pre-owned items  to achieve a unique look at an affordable price.  Throw off these high street chains and be a retro trendsetter!

    One serious story that caught our eye this week was this Observer investigation which revealed that some of the best known names on the UK high street have been dealing, albeit unknowingly, with suppliers who run sweatshop operations in India in blatant contravention of local working regulations and the industry's ethical trading initiative (ETI). Another good reason to buy fair trade, hand made, local or vintage.

  • Frockery fashionistas strut their stuff

    July 4, 2010

    50s  tweed vintage  venture 60s mini dress

    The Frockery turned out on 3rd July along with some of Scotland’s finest vintage venturers for a vintage and retro related jamboree in Kirkcaldy, hosted by the Joint Regonal Development Trust to raise funds for the B-eat Charity which supports people with eating disorders.

    Alongside stalls aplenty selling clothing, millinery, jewellery and home wares, the Green Cockatoo tea room served up welcome sustenance in truly traditional style, while music from down the decades complemented the atmosphere of the day.

    The highlight for us was the afternoon catwalk show which featured pieces from some of the stallholders, including the Frockery. The young models showed the clothes off to great effect as they strutted their stuff across the stage, showcasing outfits from the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s.

    It was an exhausting day, but we thoroughly enjoyed it, met some lovely people and acquired a few new customers. Take a bow, Hazel Kelly, for putting together such a successful event for such a worthy cause.

    crochet dress 70s hendrix fan 80s dynasty

  • Quick update

    May 18, 2010

    Apologies for the longer than usual break between updates from the frock face, but we have been busy working on our new website design which will hopefully be ready for unveiling next month.  Customers are advised that we will be closed for business from  4th June until 21st June for our annual summer break.

    It will soon be the festival season which is the perfect excuse to throw on some boho style frockery and soak up the music and atmosphere. We just love this crochet maxi dress and this ethnic print silk skirt (but don’t forget the wellies!) Tea dresses are meanwhile proving a popular choice this season, despite a distinct chill remaining in the air when the sun goes down.

    Looking a bit further in advance, we will be at the charity vintage fair being held in Kirkcaldy on 3rd July and showing a few outfits at the catwalk show, so put the date in your diary and drop by to say hello if you are in the vicinity.