budget fashion

  • You can't go wrong - or can you?

    May 15, 2008

    "You can't go wrong!", exclaimed Lorraine Kelly on GMTV this morning, positively salivating over a white tiered dress from trash fashion outlet Primark costing just £9.  Her male stylist sidekick, who was smugly showcasing it as 'Primarni', naturally nodded in simpering agreement.

    Just when we thought the media sentiment was turning - and it seems to be thus over at the BBC, whose online magazine Thread actively promotes ethical and sustainable style - LK has to go and spoil it all by encouraging us to pick up a cheap frock at a fast fashion joint before jetting off on our summer holidays without a care in the world and, clearly, without a care for the world.

    Lorraine isn't the only journalist who is promoting cheap-as-chips fashion one minute and bemoaning the environmental impact of transporting goods halfway round the world the next, all the while sympathising with the plight of overseas workers, many of them children, who are paid a pittance for their labour. These issues are all inextricably linked, and as long as we continue to support an industry which is founded upon the exploitation of both people and planet, we are all very much part of the problem.

  • The end is nigh for trash fashion

    May 13, 2008

    Yes, the end is nigh for disposable ‘trash’ fashion. Well, it must be true if the BBC are telling us that cheap chic (an oxymoron if ever there was one) is on the way out. Have they been reading our blog, we wonder?

    For the past decade or so, fast ‘fad’ fashion has dominated the high streets and supermarket aisles. A new t-shirt costs less than a bottle of wine, with the result that binge buying of cheap clothes has become something of a national pastime. Meanwhile, consumers have been largely content to enjoy the fruits of someone else’s exploited labour, or else remain blissfully ignorant of the workings of the global economy.

    However, there is evidence to suggest that the trash fashion trend may be stalling. Rocketing oil prices are taking their toll on the all important bottom line, which means an inevitable increase in the price of throwaway clothing for the consumer. Let’s face it, garment prices couldn’t come down any further without becoming ‘giveaway’ fashion!

    The credit crunch is now biting households hard across the country, which has meant a sudden and significant rise in the cost of living. As we all struggle to meet the escalating costs of life’s necessities like food, fuel and mortgage payments, we are becoming far more discerning consumers. Increasingly, we are looking for best value based on quality rather than price alone, all of which adds up to more bad news for the fast fashion industry.

    There are also signs that the mass media’s love affair with ‘fast’ culture is coming to an end. Even the BBC are now acquainting consumers with the reality of how and by whom these cheap garments are produced and how far they have to travel to reach our high streets and supermarkets. All so that we can wear them once (or not at all) and throw them away. We reckon it amounts to collective insanity.

    In reality, there is no need to stay a fast fashion clone when you can so easily and affordably set your own style with the textiles that are already in circulation. We are delighted that the BBC and style gurus everywhere are at last catching up with what we’ve known all along. It is heartening to see them embracing The Frockery’s own eco-fashion tips with such enthusiasm!

  • Frockery shopping for frugal fashionistas

    February 13, 2008

    The credit crunch is taking its toll on household budgets everywhere as the cost of living continues to soar, with upwardly mobile mortgage payments, escalating fuel prices and public transport fares making ever greater demands on all our disposable incomes.  Meanwhile, as the credit card bills continue to roll in as regular reminders of our buy now, pay later festive spending activities, it’s time to take firm financial action if we are to get back on budget. 

    In the depths of winter, however, we all need a few little indulgences to help us beat the cold weather blues and there is nothing like a new (or nearly new) fashion look to make us feel like the million dollars we don’t have! Fortunately for frugal fashionistas, The Frockery specialises in the sort of fashion which suits small budgets and, literally, doesn’t cost the earth. We endeavour to bring our customers the very best in pre-loved apparel, from vintage and retro fashion to top quality contemporary labels which have been worn only once or twice or sometimes not at all.  

    The Frockery motto is simple: why buy new when it is more fashionable, frugal and eco-friendly to go retro?   

    As veteran collectors, buyers and sellers of pre-owned, vintage and retro clothing and accessories from eras gone by, mainly the 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s, The Frockery team are big fans of the ‘slow fashion’ genre which celebrates sustainability and ethical elegance as opposed to the disposable fast fashion clone culture which dominates today’s high streets.  

    London Fashion Week has once again demonstrated that designers are continuing to borrow from the past for inspiration and we can all take a leaf out of their style files. There is no need to spend a fortune on the latest fashion trends when these are so often derived from bygone eras and you can adapt, reinvent and accessorise items from the back of your own wardrobe for next to nothing. Failing that, come and have a browse through The Frockery virtual rails for some affordable vintage fashion - or else just some good old fashioned inspiration!

  • And so that was Christmas!

    December 29, 2007

    The Frockery team are back to business after two days of turkey (and vegetarian alternative) consumption, but we are already planning to enter into the spirit of Hogmanay and a new year next week. In Scotland we celebrate for longer than those south of the border and so will be closed on New Year’s Day and 2nd January, but customers can of course still place orders at any time.

    Christmas for us was a time to stop, relax and recharge the batteries after a busy year with scarcely any respite, especially as the festive season approached. Party frocks in particular were flying off the rails until the last possible posting date (and beyond), but the most sought after item this year was a cute retro reindeer sweater, of which we only had one and which very quickly found a loving new home.

    Since we re-opened for business on 27th December, we have had an increase in visitors and our stats tell us that, even on Christmas Day, we had 58 intrepid fashionistas surfing through our frocks! Having braved Glasgow city centre the other day during the sales, we can happily say that online shopping remains our own preferred method of buying goods and services. It’s not only easier on the pocket and the planet - it also helps preserve one’s sanity!

    As 2007 draws to a close, we would like to thank our customers for shopping with us. We have got to know some lovely people over this past year and really appreciate their feedback, which tells us that, despite postal strikes and occasional delayed or missing parcels, we have usually managed to get things right.

    Our first Frockery fashion challenge proved a great success and we are hoping to repeat it in 2008. We also have a few surprises up our vintage and retro fashion sleeves, so keep dropping by for the latest Frockery news.

  • In celebration of the Little Black Dress (LBD)

    November 30, 2007

    Here at The Frockery we just love the classic little black dress, and the female members of our team all have one or two classic LBDs in their own wardrobes.

    So we were delighted to hear of the new Little Black Dress Exhibition which is to run at Brighton Museum and Art Gallery from December 2007 until 1 June 2008. Not only will it feature couturier and celebrity owned garments, but it will also include exhibits from the wardrobes of local women.

    The little black dress - now known universally by that three letter acronym LBD - is a versatile and timeless classic which can be dressed up or down and worn by women of all ages no matter what the occasion. From breakfast at Tiffany's, through a day at the office and on to the wine bar in the evening, it will never let you down!

    The LBD first came to prominence in 1926 when Coco Chanel succeeded in bringing black - previously relegated to funeral attire - into the fashion mainstream with a feminine new creation which was quickly adopted by Vogue and has been celebrated by fashionistas ever since.

    The LBD's appeal is truly universal, and while its various incarnations have made headlines over the decades for fashion icons such as Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Hurley and the late Princess of Wales, its magic somehow manages to make ordinary women look and feel special.

  • Size matters

    October 29, 2007

    We have had lots of great customer feedback over the past few weeks (thank you all!) and are now working on a few new ideas to improve The Frockery shopping experience for the many vintage and retro clothing fans out there, as well as for those who are simply looking for pre-owned contemporary pieces that will neither break the bank nor cost the earth.

    A 'search by size' function is planned, and we have also received requests for a wider selection of ladies clothes which are bigger than a size 14.  Since retro and vintage clothes tend to be on the small, if not tiny, side (as we were all a lot smaller back then) it is often more difficult to source larger sizes from past decades, but we are certainly on the case! Meanwhile, we have a few larger size posh frocks in stock, such as this black and gold glitzy party dress, which is sure to turn heads over the festive season and beyond.